The function of antibody

The function of antibody

In this article, we mainly introduce the general three main ways by which antibodies function.

 

Antibody function

Antibodies, or immunoglobulines, are little glycoproteins floating around in your body that help you fight off a lot of terrible disease-causing bacteria, viruses and the like. You know that much, I’m sure about that. However, this article will go into a few more specifics on the various methods antibodies actually use to rev up your immune system and therefore protect you.

 

Opsonization

When our Y-shaped antibodies are released by antibody-producing factories called plasma cells, they float off to attach to a very specific antigen, like a protein on the surface of a foreign cell. Lets us use a bacterium in our example. Antibodies will be made for a specific molecule on the bacterium’s surface. Only the variable domain, which is at the tip of both arms of the Y-shaped antibodies, will be able to bind to a very specific molecule on the bacterium.

 

antibody function
antibody function

Once one or both of the arms of the Y-shaped antibody have bound to the antigen on the bacterium, the tail protein of the Y-shaped antibody, known as the Fc region, will stick out into space for several important reasons. The Fc region will help to initiate a sequence of events involving other protein molecules, called complements. There are two main outcomes in the interaction between antibodies and complements.

 

One will result in the lysis, or bursting open, of the cell the antibodies are attached to. We can basically imagine that the arms of the antibodies have sharp needles. As they come into contact with the fluid-filled balloon, our bacterium, a hole is created in the surface, causing the cell or balloon to burst apart. This obviously means the cell will die.

Agglutination 

while the antibodies can act as a juice to help attract dinner mates to kill the bacterium–or any other invader for that matter–antibodies can also act like sticky syrup. Since each Y-shaped antibody has two places it can bind something , can use both arms to good effect. One arm can grab hold of one cell, and the other arm can grab hold of another identical cell. This makes the cells stick to one another. More antibodies can join in and form a chain reaction where lots of foreign invaders are stuck together and cannot move. It’s like those sticky fly traps! The flies, or deadly pathogens, are not going anywhere.

 

Once all of those cells are trapped, the tail, or Fc region of the antibodies, sticks out of the sticky clumps.

 

This is the main function antibodies have.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>